A Breeze From Blackville (1899)
Last updated: 16.10.17
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Composer: F.T. McGrath Suppliers: dbe15.gif
Editor: Geoff Grainger Quintet T/T/T+B/B/GB(B)
Publisher: Ditty Box Enterprises Publication: DBE 953
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Purchasing information Notice for leaders/bass players
Length: approx. 4¾ mins. Sounds best with the bass doubled.
A Breeze from Blackville was one of 1899's most popular cakewalks in competition with the likes of Whistling Rufus (1899) by Kerry Mills and A Coon Band Contest (1899) by Arthur Willard Pryor. Very much a local patriotic composition, the composer respectfully dedicated his work to his friend, the publisher, Mr. W. H. Teasdale of Savannah, Georgia. The front cover of the original sheet music shows in an inset a respectable looking gentleman who may be either the composer or the dedicatee. The cover also illustrates the breeze set-up by a Negress free-wheeling on a bicycle being hotly pursued by a small dog. Interestingly a signpost shows the way to Blackville Yamacraw celebrating no doubt the same-named short-lived Indian nation of some 200 souls that negotiated the transfer of its lands on the site of the present-day Savannah to the British settlers under James Oglethorpe in the 1720's. The cakewalk itself is a pleasant, easy-on-the-ear and melodious affair in AABBACCDDBB with a 4-bar introduction which progresses from A-minor to C-major finishing with F-major. In this adaptation for recorder quintet, the 1st tenor has the melodies from start to finish.
A Breeze from Blackville was published by W. H. Teasdale, Savannah, Georgia, USA
A tempo of 78 crotchets/min. is suggested.