Arthur Lynn Sizemore  (1891-1954)
Last updated: 02.10.17
Arthur Lynn Sizemore is known as the composer, collaborator or lyricist of some 70 works held in libraries around the world. He was born in Carterville, Illinois, the third child of a farming family - his elder brother Logan was the composer of Scizzor Bill (1909). He wrote 4 rags whilst still a teenager the best known of which are probably Oak Leaf Rag (1911) and The Climbers Rag (1911). He worked as a pianist, cut piano rolls and in the 1930's made occasional radio broadcasts. He died in Chicago.


Websites :
url15.gif Arthur Lynn Sizemore Biography and list of works by "Perfessor" Bill Edwards  
CDs :
Ragtime Music CDs:
cd15.gif David Thomas Roberts on "Folk Ragtime 1899-1914" flag15us.gif flag15uk.gif flag15de.gif flag15fr.gif flag15ca.gif flag15es.gif
Own Library :
sm15.gif The Climbers (1911) T/T/T/B+T/B/GB(B) dbe15.gifmp315.gif

Further sheet music at DBE: ON HOLD
Item Title Available €     £     $     Other
             
DBE1577 The Climbers (1911) - Rag
T/T/T/B+T/B/GB(B), approx. 3¼ mins.
1-2 days
other.gif
This list is arranged in chronological order and contains 14 works by Arthur Lynn Sizemore (1891-1954). It does not claim to be complete and represents only the number of items located. Key: Items on hold

Blue Blazes Rag (1909) wvicon.gif
After the Rain (1922) wvicon.gif
Co-Author: Guy Shrigley Words by: Gu Kahns
The Spanish Glide (1910)
So Tired (1927) wvicon.gif
Words by: George A Little
Arr. by Rube Bennett;
The Climbers (1911) wvicon.gif
Before the Rain (1928) wvicon.gif
Words by: Bernie Grossman
Oak Leaf Rag (1911) wvicon.gif
Mississippi Here I Am (1928) wvicon.gif
Words by: Bernie Grossman
Mississippi Shore (1919) wvicon.gif
Co-Author: E.A. van Alstyne
We'll Find Our Shelter Before the Rain (1928) wvicon.gif
Words by: Bernie Grossman
Moppin' Up Rag (191?)
Kiddies Kabaret (1929) wvicon.gif
Words & Music: Sizemore Co-Authors: Bernie Grossman, Sverre Elsmo
Right or Wrong (1921) wvicon.gif
Co-Author: P. Biese Words by: Haven Gillespie
So Comfy (1929) wvicon.gif
Words by: Bernie Grossman